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1211, 2019

Senator Wyden Headlines National Committee Town Hall on Rx Drug Pricing

By |November 12th, 2019|Max Richtman, Medicare, Prescription Drug Prices|

Sen. Ron Wyden at National Committee's Rx Drug Pricing Town Hall in Portland

Sen. Ron Wyden at National Committee’s Rx Drug Pricing Town Hall in Portland

Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) headlined a spirited town hall on prescription drug pricing Friday in Portland as part of the National Committee’s “Don’t Cut Pills, Cut Profits” campaign. A capacity crowd of local seniors attended the event at Portland Community College, featuring Senator Wyden, Congressman Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), Oregon state reps. Andrea Salinas and Rachel Prusak, and policy experts from the National Committee and AARP Oregon, which cosponsored the event.  The town hall was moderated by National Committee president and CEO Max Richtman.

“Drug prices and out-of-pocket costs paid by seniors have soared, forcing some older Americans to go without needed medications, cut pills and skip doses – or even choose between paying for medicine and groceries.  Fortunately, the elected leaders at this town hall are working hard to right this wrong.” – Max Richtman, 11/8/19

NCPSSM president Max Richtman moderates Portland town hall on Prescription Drug Pricing

The town hall coincides with intensifying efforts in Congress to pass meaningful drug price reduction legislation.  Sen. Wyden, the ranking member on the Senate Finance Committee, co-authored a bipartisan bill that would combat prescription price gouging by Big Pharma.  Rep. Blumenauer is a key supporter of legislation in the House (H.R. 3) – backed by Democratic leadership but opposed by Republicans – to allow Medicare to negotiate the price of drugs with pharmaceutical companies (among other provisions).

Sen. Wyden conceded that the House legislation goes further than his bill in the Senate, the Prescription Drug Pricing Reduction Act, which he and Republican Senator Charles Grassley (R-IA) introduced last summer.  “It’s not the bill I would have written, folks.  But it’s a good start,” Wyden told the town hall audience.

Grassley-Wyden would cap drug prices in Medicare Part D according to consumer inflation levels, slapping penalties on drug makers who fail to comply.  Sen. Wyden calls it “the first ever legislated cap on prescription price gouging.”  According to the Congressional Budget Office, the bill would save Medicare beneficiaries $27 billion in out-of-pocket drug costs.

The bipartisan Senate bill also imposes a cap on out-of-pocket costs for Medicare Part D patients, which Sen. Wyden called a “peace of mind provision.”

“This ‘peace of mind provision’ means you won’t lose your home over drug prices.  We set a cap on the annual amount you pay for prescription drugs, somewhere in the vicinity of $2,000.  No one’s going to lose their home because of the price of medicine.” – Sen. Ron Wyden at the National Committee town hall, 10/8/19

Congressman Blumenauer told seniors at the town hall that even if Grassley-Wyden and the House bill do not pass during this session of Congress, they lay down major markers in the fight against Big Pharma price gouging.  “We are keeping this issue alive, building momentum, and putting the heat on politicians to be accountable for these policies,” he said.

"Let's call Big Pharma's bluff," says Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR)

“Let’s call Big Pharma’s bluff,” says Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR)

Rep. Blumenauer also shot down Big Pharma’s claims that price reductions would harm the research and development of new medicines.  The pharmaceutical industry spends billions each year on marketing and advertising that could be put into R&D, much of which is funded by the federal government.

“Let’s call Big Pharma’s bluff:  they don’t have to pick the pockets of American consumers in order to have research. We pay the highest prescription drug prices in the world. Half of the prescriptions written are never filled or completely taken… If we’re able to bring the prices down so that people could afford their prescriptions, they’d be in better health.” – Rep. Earl Blumenauer at the National Committee town hall, 10/8/19

According to AARP, the annual average cost of prescription drugs overall increased nearly 60% between 2012-2017, while Oregonians’ income increased only 14.8%. In 2017, nearly one quarter of the state’s residents rationed pills or skipped medications altogether. Oregon seniors who have suffered the consequences of soaring drug prices shared their stories at the Portland town hall.

“Because of the high price of prescription drugs, I am afraid of a lien being placed on our family home.” – Shirley M., Portland, OR 

“I chose the provider who charges the least amount of money, and still had to refuse a medication my doctor prescribed because of cost.” – Rose B., Milwaukie, OR

“I am a diabetic and struggle to afford insulin.” – Maryanne W., Aloha, OR

Senator Wyden railed against the skyrocketing cost of insulin during the town hall:

“Insulin is taken by thousands and thousands of Oregonians. The prices have gone up in recent years thirteen-fold and the drug is not 13 times better!  It’s basically the same drug as insulin has been for decades.  Why does this go on? Because the drug companies can get away with it!” – Sen. Ron Wyden, National Committee town hall, 11/8/19

Oregon lawmakers Salinas and Prusak called the audience’s attention to measures in the legislature to combat rising drug prices on the state level.  Last year, Oregon passed a transparency law requiring drug-makers and health insurance companies to report price increases to the state’s Department of Consumer and Business Services.

Oregon state Rep. Rachel Prusak says, "It's ridiculous that people have to ration their prescription drugs because of cost."

“It’s ridiculous that people have to ration their prescription drugs.” – Ore. Rep Rachel Prusak (right)

In addition to Senator Wyden, Rep. Blumenauer, and the two state legislators, the town hall featured AARP Oregon Director Ruby Haughton-Pitts, AARP N/NE Portland Chapter President Judy Knawls Boyer, AARP Manager of Federal and State Voter Engagement Khelan Bhatia, and National Committee policy advisor Lisa Swirsky.

“The town hall was an unqualified success,” says National Committee legislative director Dan Adcock.  “The audience was engaged and interested. There were good questions and compelling stories.  People were glad to hear the latest on prescription drug pricing from key players on Capitol Hill and their own state legislators.”

************************************************************************************************

The National Committee’s Don’t Cut Pills, Cut Profits campaign educates and empowers older Americans to help exert pressure on elected leaders to reduce prescription drug prices.  The Portland town hall was preceded by an event in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on October 11th and will be followed by another in Lansing, Michigan on December 9th.


711, 2019

Seriously Ill Seniors Face Daunting Costs, Especially for Rx Drugs

By |November 7th, 2019|Medicare, Prescription Drug Prices|

seniors on medicare face unaffordable health care costs, especially for prescription drugs

The National Committee has been beating the drum about seniors’ rising health care costs for several years.  Now, a new study from Health Affairs confirms that seriously ill seniors face especially daunting financial hardships.  According to the study, 53% of seriously ill Medicare patients are experiencing grave difficulty paying their medical bills, with unaffordable prescription drug costs posing the biggest challenge.

“The perception that Medicare works well for most beneficiaries obscures the financial exposure that is concentrated among the seriously ill.  High-need Medicare beneficiaries may be especially vulnerable, since patients in the top 5% of spending account for more than half of out-of-pocket spending.” – Health Affairs, November, 2019 

The study indicates that these financial burdens are taking a serious toll on seniors and their families. One quarter of respondents said that costs were a “major burden,” and 60% reported that family members and friends had helped out with health care costs “a lot.”  When asked which medical costs posed the largest burden, 30% responded “prescription drugs,” second only to “any medical expense.”

Source: Health Affairs

Older Americans have been particularly hard hit at the pharmacy counter in recent years. Prices for the 20 most-prescribed drugs for seniors increased approximately ten times the rate of inflation between 2013-2018.  One million Medicare beneficiaries paid nearly $3,200 in out-of-pocket drug costs in 2016.  Increased cost sharing for prescription drugs has forced seniors to forgo needed medications, cut pills, and skip doses – or choose between medicine and groceries.

The National Committee is in the midst of a campaign to reduce seniors’ prescription drug costs, entitled “Don’t Cut Pills, Cut Profits.”  The campaign includes town halls in select American cities.  The first one took place in Milwaukee in October; the second happens Friday in Portland, Oregon.   A third town hall will take place in Lansing, Michigan on December 9th.  At each town hall, local seniors have the opportunity to dialogue with elected leaders, in order to become educated and empowered to lower prescription prices.

Attendees of these town halls have shared heartbreaking stories about soaring drug costs.

“The inhalers for my lung cancer cost $200 a month. We pay $270 a month for Medicare. My husband cuts his pills.”

“A medicine that helps me with chronic pain is unaffordable. It’s only $170 a month, but on a Social Security income, I can’t pay for it.”

“My medication costs put a major strain on my monthly Social Security checks.”

Crushing medical costs have negative consequences for seniors’ physical and financial health, according to the new study.  More than one third of respondents said they had exhausted “all or most” of their savings to pay medical bills.  Twenty-seven percent indicated they had been contacted by a collection agency.  Nearly one-quarter of the seniors surveyed said they were not able to pay for essentials such as food, utility bills, and housing. 

To mitigate the financial strain on seniors, the National Committee advocates catastrophic caps on out-of-pocket costs for Medicare Part B and Part D beneficiaries, improved supplemental Medigap coverage, and the passage of legislation to allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices with Big Pharma, which would produce some $345 billion in cost savings over seven years. These represent reasonable, common sense solutions to stop seniors from going broke because of soaring health care costs in the world’s wealthiest nation. 


3110, 2019

Social Security Doesn’t Need Rescue by Mitt Romney

By |October 31st, 2019|Democrats, entitlement reform, Republicans, Social Security|

Senator Romney proposes Social Security trust fund "rescue committees" as cover for "entitlement reform" that would hurt seniors

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT) proposes “rescue committee” for Social Security trust fund

On Tuesday, Senator Mitt Romney (R-UT) unveiled legislation that would put the future of Social Security in the hands of a special committee, claiming that “if you ever want to see a balanced budget, if you ever want to get out of debt, you have to deal with these trust funds.”  National Committee president and CEO Max Richtman pushed back on Romney’s proposal yesterday as yet another attempt at “entitlement reform” that would hurt seniors.

“The last thing seniors need is for Mitt Romney to get his hands on Social Security.  The Utah Senator intends to introduce a bill establishing a ‘Rescue Committee’ which would write legislation to keep the Social Security trust fund solvent for 75 years.  We need only look to recent history to determine what Romney has in mind. During his failed 2012 presidential campaign, Romney proposed to raise the Social Security retirement age and slow the growth of benefits for some retirees.   Romney’s 2012 running mate, Paul Ryan, fought to privatize Social Security throughout his two decades on Capitol Hill.  Fortunately, Americans rejected Romney and Ryan’s bleak vision for Social Security’s future. 

Like an earlier, failed proposal in the 115th Congress to establish a special Social Security commission, Senator Romney’s ‘rescue committee’ would set up a process that puts benefits at risk, forcing millions of older Americans onto a pathway toward poverty.   

The Senator’s bill also ignores legislation already introduced by Democrats that doesn’t ask seniors to bear the cost of strengthening Social Security’s finances.  Rep. John Larson’s Social Security 2100 Act would keep the program financially sound for more than 75 years without raising the retirement age or cutting benefits. It even includes a modest benefit boost.  Bernie Sanders (I-VT) has introduced a similar bill in the Senate. As for Romney’s latest “entitlement reform” plan, we’ve seen this pitch before – and seniors aren’t buying it.” – Max Richtman, President and CEO of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare 


2310, 2019

Medicare Price Negotiation Bill Headed to House Floor

By |October 23rd, 2019|Congress, Democrats, Medicare, Prescription Drug Prices, Republicans|

For 16 years, the National Committee and other seniors’ advocates have been pressuring Congress to pass legislation empowering Medicare to negotiate prescription drug prices with Big Pharma.  That goal finally appears within reach.  Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Lower Drug Costs Now Act (H.R. 3) will get a floor vote by the end of this month, according to several news reports.  The bill was approved by the House Ways and Means Committee yesterday, teeing up a vote by the full House.

“After years of Congressional inaction, we’re moving legislation to lower drug prices and save American families money. H.R. 3 levels the playing field for U.S. consumers who, on average, pay four times more than patients in other countries for the exact same drugs.” – Rep. Richard Neal (D-MA), House Ways and Committee chairman 

On Tuesday, House Ways and Means Committee chair Richard Neal (D-MA) announced that the bill would be re-named in honor of Rep. Elijah Cummings, a champion for seniors, who passed away last week.

The National Committee has endorsed the bill as an “important step toward lowering prescription drug costs for seniors.” The legislation not only authorizes Medicare to negotiate prices, but includes punitive measures for pharmaceutical companies who don’t play ball – and significantly reduces beneficiaries’ drug expenses.  The bill features:

*A substantial penalty (starting at 65% of the gross sales of the drug) if a drugmaker refuses to negotiate or doesn’t reach an agreement on price.

*A $2,000 cap on seniors’ Medicare out-of-pocket costs for prescription drug spending.

*An inflation cap on drug reimbursement to curb excessive drug price escalation.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates that the bill would save Medicare $345 billion over seven years – money that Speaker Pelosi says could be put toward (among other things) expanding benefits to include dental, vision, and hearing coverage.

Speaker Pelosi says the bill represents “bold action to level the playing field” for Medicare patients.

Progressives in the committee markups won concessions to better reflect their vision.  Amendments were added to increase the minimum number of drugs Medicare must negotiate each year from 25 to 35 — and to require that a new drug must have at least two generic competitors before being excluded from price negotiations, instead of one.  The National Committee lobbied legislators to pass both amendments.

“Typically, the entry of one generic competitor produces only a slight reduction in prices. It is the entry of a second generic competitor that really drives down a drug’s cost – to nearly half the brand name price.” – National Committee letter to Speaker Pelosi, 10/15/19

Many Republicans complain that Pelosi’s bill interferes with the free market — and that it amounts to a federal “takeover” of prescription drug pricing.  Democrats counter that the free market has clearly failed to produce affordable drug prices, with cash-strapped seniors skipping medications or cutting pills in half.   They also point out that price negotiation is an important facet of free markets.

With Democrats holding a 234-197 majority in the U.S. House, The Lower Drug Costs Now Act is expected to pass when it comes to the floor later this month.  On the other side of the Capitol, the Senate Finance Committee has approved a bipartisan drug pricing bill introduced by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA).  The Grassley-Wyden bill features reasonable measures to lower drug prices, but does not include price negotiation.  Some Senate Republicans have already come out against Grassley-Wyden.  Predictably, Big Pharma opposes both bills – House and Senate – and spent $6.2 million on lobbying in the third quarter of 2019, a quarter million dollars more than the same period last year.


1710, 2019

Mourning the Loss of a True Champion for Seniors in Congress

By |October 17th, 2019|Congress, Max Richtman, Medicare, Social Security|

Congressman Elijah Cummings was a 'true champion' for seniors

Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD), 1951-2019

America’s seniors have lost a true champion with the passing of Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) at the age of 68.  The Congressman, who was chairman of the House Oversight Committee, forcefully and eloquently advocated for Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and lowering prescription drug prices.  His staunch support of seniors’ priorities repeatedly earned Rep. Cummings a 100% rating from the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare.  He served in Congress for more than twenty years, representing a diverse constituency in Baltimore and its suburbs.

“We mourn the passing of a great leader for all people. Congressman Elijah E. Cummings maintained a deep understanding of the complexities of aging and knew that social policy programs like Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security were not only safety nets for individuals, but they also strengthened families and communities.” – Max Richtman, President and CEO of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare.

During an era when Social Security has come under sustained attack from conservatives, Rep. Cummings unabashedly fought for strengthening and expanding the program.  He cosponsored Rep. John Larson’s Social Security 2100 Act, and opposed the closures of Social Security Administration field offices in underserved neighborhoods, including one in the city of Baltimore.

“I believe that Social Security is a binding promise between government and its citizens, and I oppose any effort to reduce benefits.  Social Security is not just a cushion, it is the single lifeline keeping [seniors] out of poverty… particularly low-wage and manual laborers who may be in poorer physical health.” – Rep. Elijah Cummings

A dedicated advocate for affordable and accessible health care for all Americans, Congressman Cummings championed the Affordable Care Act and fought attempts in Congress to repeal it.  He made lowering prescription drug prices a priority, as well, cosponsoring the Affordable and Safe Prescription Drug Importation Act and the Medicare Price Negotiation Act.  As House Oversight Committee chair, Congressman Cummings launched an investigation “to determine why drug companies—including insulin makers—are increasing prices so dramatically and what they are doing with the proceeds.”

Elijah Cummings fought alongside the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare to keep Social Security field offices open

Rep. Cummings with colleague Rep. John Sarbanes (Left) in 2017

Today, colleagues and constituents remember Rep. Cummings as a compassionate, engaged, and eloquent leader who will not be easy to replace.

“Congressman Cummings voted with his head and his heart on issues of concern to millions of our organization’s members… We will always be grateful to this humble, hardworking and dedicated public servant and will deeply miss his passionate support for a better quality of life for older Americans.” – Max Richtman, 10/17/19


Senator Wyden Headlines National Committee Town Hall on Rx Drug Pricing

By |November 12th, 2019|Max Richtman, Medicare, Prescription Drug Prices|

Sen. Ron Wyden at National Committee's Rx Drug Pricing Town Hall in Portland

Sen. Ron Wyden at National Committee’s Rx Drug Pricing Town Hall in Portland

Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) headlined a spirited town hall on prescription drug pricing Friday in Portland as part of the National Committee’s “Don’t Cut Pills, Cut Profits” campaign. A capacity crowd of local seniors attended the event at Portland Community College, featuring Senator Wyden, Congressman Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), Oregon state reps. Andrea Salinas and Rachel Prusak, and policy experts from the National Committee and AARP Oregon, which cosponsored the event.  The town hall was moderated by National Committee president and CEO Max Richtman.

“Drug prices and out-of-pocket costs paid by seniors have soared, forcing some older Americans to go without needed medications, cut pills and skip doses – or even choose between paying for medicine and groceries.  Fortunately, the elected leaders at this town hall are working hard to right this wrong.” – Max Richtman, 11/8/19

NCPSSM president Max Richtman moderates Portland town hall on Prescription Drug Pricing

The town hall coincides with intensifying efforts in Congress to pass meaningful drug price reduction legislation.  Sen. Wyden, the ranking member on the Senate Finance Committee, co-authored a bipartisan bill that would combat prescription price gouging by Big Pharma.  Rep. Blumenauer is a key supporter of legislation in the House (H.R. 3) – backed by Democratic leadership but opposed by Republicans – to allow Medicare to negotiate the price of drugs with pharmaceutical companies (among other provisions).

Sen. Wyden conceded that the House legislation goes further than his bill in the Senate, the Prescription Drug Pricing Reduction Act, which he and Republican Senator Charles Grassley (R-IA) introduced last summer.  “It’s not the bill I would have written, folks.  But it’s a good start,” Wyden told the town hall audience.

Grassley-Wyden would cap drug prices in Medicare Part D according to consumer inflation levels, slapping penalties on drug makers who fail to comply.  Sen. Wyden calls it “the first ever legislated cap on prescription price gouging.”  According to the Congressional Budget Office, the bill would save Medicare beneficiaries $27 billion in out-of-pocket drug costs.

The bipartisan Senate bill also imposes a cap on out-of-pocket costs for Medicare Part D patients, which Sen. Wyden called a “peace of mind provision.”

“This ‘peace of mind provision’ means you won’t lose your home over drug prices.  We set a cap on the annual amount you pay for prescription drugs, somewhere in the vicinity of $2,000.  No one’s going to lose their home because of the price of medicine.” – Sen. Ron Wyden at the National Committee town hall, 10/8/19

Congressman Blumenauer told seniors at the town hall that even if Grassley-Wyden and the House bill do not pass during this session of Congress, they lay down major markers in the fight against Big Pharma price gouging.  “We are keeping this issue alive, building momentum, and putting the heat on politicians to be accountable for these policies,” he said.

"Let's call Big Pharma's bluff," says Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR)

“Let’s call Big Pharma’s bluff,” says Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR)

Rep. Blumenauer also shot down Big Pharma’s claims that price reductions would harm the research and development of new medicines.  The pharmaceutical industry spends billions each year on marketing and advertising that could be put into R&D, much of which is funded by the federal government.

“Let’s call Big Pharma’s bluff:  they don’t have to pick the pockets of American consumers in order to have research. We pay the highest prescription drug prices in the world. Half of the prescriptions written are never filled or completely taken… If we’re able to bring the prices down so that people could afford their prescriptions, they’d be in better health.” – Rep. Earl Blumenauer at the National Committee town hall, 10/8/19

According to AARP, the annual average cost of prescription drugs overall increased nearly 60% between 2012-2017, while Oregonians’ income increased only 14.8%. In 2017, nearly one quarter of the state’s residents rationed pills or skipped medications altogether. Oregon seniors who have suffered the consequences of soaring drug prices shared their stories at the Portland town hall.

“Because of the high price of prescription drugs, I am afraid of a lien being placed on our family home.” – Shirley M., Portland, OR 

“I chose the provider who charges the least amount of money, and still had to refuse a medication my doctor prescribed because of cost.” – Rose B., Milwaukie, OR

“I am a diabetic and struggle to afford insulin.” – Maryanne W., Aloha, OR

Senator Wyden railed against the skyrocketing cost of insulin during the town hall:

“Insulin is taken by thousands and thousands of Oregonians. The prices have gone up in recent years thirteen-fold and the drug is not 13 times better!  It’s basically the same drug as insulin has been for decades.  Why does this go on? Because the drug companies can get away with it!” – Sen. Ron Wyden, National Committee town hall, 11/8/19

Oregon lawmakers Salinas and Prusak called the audience’s attention to measures in the legislature to combat rising drug prices on the state level.  Last year, Oregon passed a transparency law requiring drug-makers and health insurance companies to report price increases to the state’s Department of Consumer and Business Services.

Oregon state Rep. Rachel Prusak says, "It's ridiculous that people have to ration their prescription drugs because of cost."

“It’s ridiculous that people have to ration their prescription drugs.” – Ore. Rep Rachel Prusak (right)

In addition to Senator Wyden, Rep. Blumenauer, and the two state legislators, the town hall featured AARP Oregon Director Ruby Haughton-Pitts, AARP N/NE Portland Chapter President Judy Knawls Boyer, AARP Manager of Federal and State Voter Engagement Khelan Bhatia, and National Committee policy advisor Lisa Swirsky.

“The town hall was an unqualified success,” says National Committee legislative director Dan Adcock.  “The audience was engaged and interested. There were good questions and compelling stories.  People were glad to hear the latest on prescription drug pricing from key players on Capitol Hill and their own state legislators.”

************************************************************************************************

The National Committee’s Don’t Cut Pills, Cut Profits campaign educates and empowers older Americans to help exert pressure on elected leaders to reduce prescription drug prices.  The Portland town hall was preceded by an event in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on October 11th and will be followed by another in Lansing, Michigan on December 9th.


Seriously Ill Seniors Face Daunting Costs, Especially for Rx Drugs

By |November 7th, 2019|Medicare, Prescription Drug Prices|

seniors on medicare face unaffordable health care costs, especially for prescription drugs

The National Committee has been beating the drum about seniors’ rising health care costs for several years.  Now, a new study from Health Affairs confirms that seriously ill seniors face especially daunting financial hardships.  According to the study, 53% of seriously ill Medicare patients are experiencing grave difficulty paying their medical bills, with unaffordable prescription drug costs posing the biggest challenge.

“The perception that Medicare works well for most beneficiaries obscures the financial exposure that is concentrated among the seriously ill.  High-need Medicare beneficiaries may be especially vulnerable, since patients in the top 5% of spending account for more than half of out-of-pocket spending.” – Health Affairs, November, 2019 

The study indicates that these financial burdens are taking a serious toll on seniors and their families. One quarter of respondents said that costs were a “major burden,” and 60% reported that family members and friends had helped out with health care costs “a lot.”  When asked which medical costs posed the largest burden, 30% responded “prescription drugs,” second only to “any medical expense.”

Source: Health Affairs

Older Americans have been particularly hard hit at the pharmacy counter in recent years. Prices for the 20 most-prescribed drugs for seniors increased approximately ten times the rate of inflation between 2013-2018.  One million Medicare beneficiaries paid nearly $3,200 in out-of-pocket drug costs in 2016.  Increased cost sharing for prescription drugs has forced seniors to forgo needed medications, cut pills, and skip doses – or choose between medicine and groceries.

The National Committee is in the midst of a campaign to reduce seniors’ prescription drug costs, entitled “Don’t Cut Pills, Cut Profits.”  The campaign includes town halls in select American cities.  The first one took place in Milwaukee in October; the second happens Friday in Portland, Oregon.   A third town hall will take place in Lansing, Michigan on December 9th.  At each town hall, local seniors have the opportunity to dialogue with elected leaders, in order to become educated and empowered to lower prescription prices.

Attendees of these town halls have shared heartbreaking stories about soaring drug costs.

“The inhalers for my lung cancer cost $200 a month. We pay $270 a month for Medicare. My husband cuts his pills.”

“A medicine that helps me with chronic pain is unaffordable. It’s only $170 a month, but on a Social Security income, I can’t pay for it.”

“My medication costs put a major strain on my monthly Social Security checks.”

Crushing medical costs have negative consequences for seniors’ physical and financial health, according to the new study.  More than one third of respondents said they had exhausted “all or most” of their savings to pay medical bills.  Twenty-seven percent indicated they had been contacted by a collection agency.  Nearly one-quarter of the seniors surveyed said they were not able to pay for essentials such as food, utility bills, and housing. 

To mitigate the financial strain on seniors, the National Committee advocates catastrophic caps on out-of-pocket costs for Medicare Part B and Part D beneficiaries, improved supplemental Medigap coverage, and the passage of legislation to allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices with Big Pharma, which would produce some $345 billion in cost savings over seven years. These represent reasonable, common sense solutions to stop seniors from going broke because of soaring health care costs in the world’s wealthiest nation. 


Social Security Doesn’t Need Rescue by Mitt Romney

By |October 31st, 2019|Democrats, entitlement reform, Republicans, Social Security|

Senator Romney proposes Social Security trust fund "rescue committees" as cover for "entitlement reform" that would hurt seniors

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT) proposes “rescue committee” for Social Security trust fund

On Tuesday, Senator Mitt Romney (R-UT) unveiled legislation that would put the future of Social Security in the hands of a special committee, claiming that “if you ever want to see a balanced budget, if you ever want to get out of debt, you have to deal with these trust funds.”  National Committee president and CEO Max Richtman pushed back on Romney’s proposal yesterday as yet another attempt at “entitlement reform” that would hurt seniors.

“The last thing seniors need is for Mitt Romney to get his hands on Social Security.  The Utah Senator intends to introduce a bill establishing a ‘Rescue Committee’ which would write legislation to keep the Social Security trust fund solvent for 75 years.  We need only look to recent history to determine what Romney has in mind. During his failed 2012 presidential campaign, Romney proposed to raise the Social Security retirement age and slow the growth of benefits for some retirees.   Romney’s 2012 running mate, Paul Ryan, fought to privatize Social Security throughout his two decades on Capitol Hill.  Fortunately, Americans rejected Romney and Ryan’s bleak vision for Social Security’s future. 

Like an earlier, failed proposal in the 115th Congress to establish a special Social Security commission, Senator Romney’s ‘rescue committee’ would set up a process that puts benefits at risk, forcing millions of older Americans onto a pathway toward poverty.   

The Senator’s bill also ignores legislation already introduced by Democrats that doesn’t ask seniors to bear the cost of strengthening Social Security’s finances.  Rep. John Larson’s Social Security 2100 Act would keep the program financially sound for more than 75 years without raising the retirement age or cutting benefits. It even includes a modest benefit boost.  Bernie Sanders (I-VT) has introduced a similar bill in the Senate. As for Romney’s latest “entitlement reform” plan, we’ve seen this pitch before – and seniors aren’t buying it.” – Max Richtman, President and CEO of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare 


Medicare Price Negotiation Bill Headed to House Floor

By |October 23rd, 2019|Congress, Democrats, Medicare, Prescription Drug Prices, Republicans|

For 16 years, the National Committee and other seniors’ advocates have been pressuring Congress to pass legislation empowering Medicare to negotiate prescription drug prices with Big Pharma.  That goal finally appears within reach.  Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Lower Drug Costs Now Act (H.R. 3) will get a floor vote by the end of this month, according to several news reports.  The bill was approved by the House Ways and Means Committee yesterday, teeing up a vote by the full House.

“After years of Congressional inaction, we’re moving legislation to lower drug prices and save American families money. H.R. 3 levels the playing field for U.S. consumers who, on average, pay four times more than patients in other countries for the exact same drugs.” – Rep. Richard Neal (D-MA), House Ways and Committee chairman 

On Tuesday, House Ways and Means Committee chair Richard Neal (D-MA) announced that the bill would be re-named in honor of Rep. Elijah Cummings, a champion for seniors, who passed away last week.

The National Committee has endorsed the bill as an “important step toward lowering prescription drug costs for seniors.” The legislation not only authorizes Medicare to negotiate prices, but includes punitive measures for pharmaceutical companies who don’t play ball – and significantly reduces beneficiaries’ drug expenses.  The bill features:

*A substantial penalty (starting at 65% of the gross sales of the drug) if a drugmaker refuses to negotiate or doesn’t reach an agreement on price.

*A $2,000 cap on seniors’ Medicare out-of-pocket costs for prescription drug spending.

*An inflation cap on drug reimbursement to curb excessive drug price escalation.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates that the bill would save Medicare $345 billion over seven years – money that Speaker Pelosi says could be put toward (among other things) expanding benefits to include dental, vision, and hearing coverage.

Speaker Pelosi says the bill represents “bold action to level the playing field” for Medicare patients.

Progressives in the committee markups won concessions to better reflect their vision.  Amendments were added to increase the minimum number of drugs Medicare must negotiate each year from 25 to 35 — and to require that a new drug must have at least two generic competitors before being excluded from price negotiations, instead of one.  The National Committee lobbied legislators to pass both amendments.

“Typically, the entry of one generic competitor produces only a slight reduction in prices. It is the entry of a second generic competitor that really drives down a drug’s cost – to nearly half the brand name price.” – National Committee letter to Speaker Pelosi, 10/15/19

Many Republicans complain that Pelosi’s bill interferes with the free market — and that it amounts to a federal “takeover” of prescription drug pricing.  Democrats counter that the free market has clearly failed to produce affordable drug prices, with cash-strapped seniors skipping medications or cutting pills in half.   They also point out that price negotiation is an important facet of free markets.

With Democrats holding a 234-197 majority in the U.S. House, The Lower Drug Costs Now Act is expected to pass when it comes to the floor later this month.  On the other side of the Capitol, the Senate Finance Committee has approved a bipartisan drug pricing bill introduced by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA).  The Grassley-Wyden bill features reasonable measures to lower drug prices, but does not include price negotiation.  Some Senate Republicans have already come out against Grassley-Wyden.  Predictably, Big Pharma opposes both bills – House and Senate – and spent $6.2 million on lobbying in the third quarter of 2019, a quarter million dollars more than the same period last year.


Mourning the Loss of a True Champion for Seniors in Congress

By |October 17th, 2019|Congress, Max Richtman, Medicare, Social Security|

Congressman Elijah Cummings was a 'true champion' for seniors

Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD), 1951-2019

America’s seniors have lost a true champion with the passing of Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) at the age of 68.  The Congressman, who was chairman of the House Oversight Committee, forcefully and eloquently advocated for Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and lowering prescription drug prices.  His staunch support of seniors’ priorities repeatedly earned Rep. Cummings a 100% rating from the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare.  He served in Congress for more than twenty years, representing a diverse constituency in Baltimore and its suburbs.

“We mourn the passing of a great leader for all people. Congressman Elijah E. Cummings maintained a deep understanding of the complexities of aging and knew that social policy programs like Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security were not only safety nets for individuals, but they also strengthened families and communities.” – Max Richtman, President and CEO of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare.

During an era when Social Security has come under sustained attack from conservatives, Rep. Cummings unabashedly fought for strengthening and expanding the program.  He cosponsored Rep. John Larson’s Social Security 2100 Act, and opposed the closures of Social Security Administration field offices in underserved neighborhoods, including one in the city of Baltimore.

“I believe that Social Security is a binding promise between government and its citizens, and I oppose any effort to reduce benefits.  Social Security is not just a cushion, it is the single lifeline keeping [seniors] out of poverty… particularly low-wage and manual laborers who may be in poorer physical health.” – Rep. Elijah Cummings

A dedicated advocate for affordable and accessible health care for all Americans, Congressman Cummings championed the Affordable Care Act and fought attempts in Congress to repeal it.  He made lowering prescription drug prices a priority, as well, cosponsoring the Affordable and Safe Prescription Drug Importation Act and the Medicare Price Negotiation Act.  As House Oversight Committee chair, Congressman Cummings launched an investigation “to determine why drug companies—including insulin makers—are increasing prices so dramatically and what they are doing with the proceeds.”

Elijah Cummings fought alongside the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare to keep Social Security field offices open

Rep. Cummings with colleague Rep. John Sarbanes (Left) in 2017

Today, colleagues and constituents remember Rep. Cummings as a compassionate, engaged, and eloquent leader who will not be easy to replace.

“Congressman Cummings voted with his head and his heart on issues of concern to millions of our organization’s members… We will always be grateful to this humble, hardworking and dedicated public servant and will deeply miss his passionate support for a better quality of life for older Americans.” – Max Richtman, 10/17/19