Republicans Are Playing With Fire – and Seniors’ Earned Benefits – By Risking Default

Today’s breaching of the debt ceiling by the U.S. government is making seniors’ advocates nervous.  The federal government is now on track to default on its financial obligations (including the ability to make Social Security and Medicare payments) as early as June --- unless Congress raises the debt ceiling, which it has done 78 times since 1960.  As CNN's Jake Tapper put it, "Republicans are vowing to cut future spending before agreeing to pay bills that are already due."
2023-02-03T12:32:29-04:00January 19th, 2023|Categories: Budget, Congress, Debt, Kevin McCarthy, Medicaid, Medicare, President Biden, Social Security|

Does New Hill Spending Deal Affect Social Security & Medicare?

Congressional negotiators have struck a compromise on spending for Fiscal Year 2023, avoiding a government shutdown this Friday.  The House and Senate are expected to pass a short-term extension by the end of this week, giving negotiators more time to finish a final funding package for the rest of the fiscal year.  We spoke with NCPSSM legislative director Dan Adcock about the compromise deal.

What Does the President’s Budget Mean for Seniors?

There’s encouraging news for seniors in President Biden’s FY2023 budget, even though it does not contain everything that advocates for older Americans had hoped.  The budget, which now will be submitted to Congress, includes crucial funding for services that seniors rely upon – from the operation of the Social Security Administration (SSA) to nutrition programs under the Older Americans Act.

What’s Happening with Budget Reconciliation Legislation Affecting Seniors?

As Democrats attempt to unite around a final budget reconciliation package – otherwise known as President Biden’s Build Back Better Plan – seniors advocates are keeping a close eye on key provisions affecting older Americans.
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