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Trump Snubs Seniors in Speech to Congress

Millions of current and future retirees were no doubt hoping that President Trump would use last night’s speech to Congress to reaffirm his promises not to touch Social Security and Medicare.  Instead, the President ducked and covered.  He did not even utter the words “Social Security” or “Medicare” in his entire hour-long address.  As for Medicaid – which millions of American seniors rely upon for skilled nursing care – the President only touched on it once, with a veiled reference to converting guaranteed benefits into block grants, which would hurt beneficiaries.   

This begs the question – why the silence on Social Security and Medicare?  After all, during the campaign the President broke with Republican orthodoxy and repeatedly promised not to cut either earned benefit program. “I am going to protect and save your Social Security and your Medicare.  You made a deal a long time ago,” he told a crowd of supporters in November.  The most likely explanation for omitting America’s retirement security programs from last night’s speech is that the President knows his fellow Republicans on Capitol Hill vehemently disagree with him.  

There are proposals in both the House and Senate to cut and privatize Social Security and Medicare.  In fact, voucherizing Medicare is one of Speaker Paul Ryan’s highest priorities.  Perhaps the President did not want to unnecessarily ruffle feathers on the Hill last night.  If so, his refusal to recommit to protecting Social Security and Medicare is not an encouraging sign. If he’s afraid to even mention his position in a speech to Congress, he may roll over on campaign promises under pressure from the Congressional GOP.

President Trump may also be leaving himself wiggle room in negotiations with Congress over Social Security and Medicare.  The problem is, any compromise on his promise will hurt seniors and people with disabilities who depend on these programs, whether it’s cutting benefits, raising the retirement age, or trimming COLAs.  He may also be setting up a dodge, where the Congress agrees not to cut Social Security or Medicare for current retirees while leaving open the possibility of downsizing or privatizing both programs for younger Americans.  This approach is based on the falsehood that cutting benefits for future retirees doesn’t hurt current seniors, and cynically pits one generation against the others for political expediency. Mark Miller of Reuters has an excellent piece today explaining this ploy:

"The [Republicans’] political goal will be to defang public opposition, since younger workers tend not to focus much on retirement when it is several decades away. But that approach is not going to work. Retirees and their advocacy groups will fiercely resist cutting benefits down the road, because they understand the critical importance of Social Security and Medicare benefits. They also care about the future retirement of their own children.  - Mark Miller, Reuters

Social Security and Medicare are commitments that the government made to working class Americans who paid into the system most of their lives.  The President could have confirmed that commitment last night and comforted seniors who are worried about losing their retirement security and healthcare.  His silence on Capitol Hill was not reassuring.

 

New Cost of Living Formula Could Put Real Money in Seniors' Pockets

 

There is a new push on Capitol Hill to link Cost of Living adjustments (COLAs) for federal retirement programs to a much more powerful indicator of the prices seniors really pay for crucial goods and services.  It’s called the Consumer Price Index for the Elderly (CPI-E), an experimental metric by the Bureau of Labor Statistics that more accurately reflects senior’s costs than the traditional Consumer Price Index (CPI), or even the Consumer Price Index for Wage Earners (CPI-W), which the government currently uses to calculate COLAs for Social Security.  Switching over to the CPI-E could mean a substantial increase in benefits for retirees.  

Congressman John Garamendi (D-CA) is reviving a 2015 House bill to mandate that the CPI-E be used to calculate cost of living adjustments for federal retirement programs. The National Committee has endorsed Garamendi's legislation.

"The consumption patterns of seniors are different from those of younger people. Using the CPI-E will ensure that benefits for retirees are not diluted by disproportionately rising costs in sectors affecting seniors. The CPI-E is the most accurate and balanced measure of the real costs that seniors face in retirement."  – Rep. John Garamendi (D-CA)

Like the standard CPI, the new index calculates the prices of a typical basket of goods and serves that are affected by inflation.  The difference is that the CPI-E looks at a basket that reflects the kinds of items seniors spend money on.  For instance, housing and medical costs make up a much bigger chunk of seniors’ expenses (58%) in the CPI-E than in the traditional CPI.  On the other hand, food and transportation costs are de-emphasized in the CPI-E, since seniors typically spend less of their money on those items than the general population does. 

If Congressman Garamendi’s bill were to become law, the CPI-E could mean serious new money in retirees’ pockets.  Research compiled from Bureau of Labor Statistics data (based on the current CPI-E model) reveals:

  • If the CPI-E had been in effect for the past 30 years, retirees would have received 22% more in cost-of-living increases.
  • If you as an average worker retired in 2015 with the current CPI-E in place, you would receive nearly $30,000 in additional benefits for the rest of your lifetime.

With 1 out of 3 seniors relying on Social Security for all or most of their income, those increases could make a huge difference.  At a time when Congressional Republicans (most notably Rep. Sam Johnson of Texas) are planning to cut COLAs, the Garamendi bill plants a flag on a crucial issue that could mean the difference between financial stability and poverty for millions of seniors.

Scrapping the Cap: National Committee endorses Bernie’s new Social Security Bill; Marks the Day Millionaires Stop Paying payroll taxes.

Senator Bernie Sanders and Rep. Peter DeFazio introduced landmark legislation yesterday to keep Social Security solvent for the next six decades --- without cutting anyone’s benefits.  The National Committee endorses the bill, titled the Social Security Expansion Act, introduced on the day when the average millionaire reaches the payroll tax income cap of $127,000 per year.

National Committee President Max Richtman joined Senator Sanders, Senator Elizabeth Warren, Rep DeFazio and other dignitaries and advocacy groups on Capitol Hill to mark the day and support the new legislation, which would require high-earners to pay Social Security taxes on annual income over $250,000. 

The bill doesn’t “scrap the cap” right away; but for now only income between $127,000 and $250,000 would be exempt from payroll taxes.  Eventually the cap would phased out and completely scrapped.   The expanded payroll taxes (which only affect the top 1.5% of earners) would keep the Social Security Trust Fund flush until at least 2078.   

"We can expand the life of Social Security for 61 years, if we have the guts to tell millionaires and billionaires they’re going to have to pay more in taxes.” – Sen. Bernie Sanders

Senator Warren passionately defended the bill, saying it is necessary because, under current law:

"...Once [the wealthy] hit the cap, they can earn and earn and earn without paying into the system.  We want a Social Security system that works of all America, not just the millionaires and billionaires.” – Sen. Elizabeth Warren

NCPSSM President Max Richtman referred to a favorite metaphor involving a high-earning NBA superstar paying into Social Security.  “He’s already hit the cap and is done contributing before the first quarter of the first game of the season is over.” On a more serious note, he continued, “We are here today to say that for those who have so much, it is only right that they pay their fair share into the Social Security program.”

Richtman used the occasion to recall the words of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who started the Social Security system:

"The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much, it is whether we provide enough for those who have little."  - FDR

In addition to lifting the cap, the Sanders-DeFazio bill increases Social Security benefits by an estimated $65 a month, improves the Special Minimum Benefit by making it easier for low-income workers to qualify for benefits, and links the cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) formula to a new Consumer Price Index for the Elderly (CPI-E) to factor in costs seniors traditionally face such as prescription drugs, utility bills and property taxes. 

 

New Poll Shows Majorities Do Not Support GOP Proposals for Social Security and Medicare

Americans overwhelmingly support traditional Social Security and Medicare and oppose benefit cuts, according to a new poll released this week by the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. At a time when Congressional Republicans are proposing to fundamentally alter both programs, strong majorities of voters want Congress to protect Social Security and Medicare – and intensely disagree with key provisions of GOP plans.

In the poll of likely voters, 79% favor increasing Social Security benefits --- and funding that increase by having wealthy Americans pay the same rate into Social Security as everyone else.   Seventy-seven percent oppose raising the Social Security retirement age to 69, and a whopping 93% favor allowing Medicare to negotiate to bring down the price of prescription drugs.

“These results prove that Americans want Congress to honor the commitment to all working people who paid into Social Security and Medicare, and keep their hands off these programs,” said Max Richtman, President and CEO of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. “This should be a warning to members of Congress that they tamper with our cherished social insurance programs at their peril.”

The poll results were released Tuesday at the U.S. Capitol by Richtman, with Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-MD); Rep. John Larson (D-CT); Rep. Tony Cardenas (D-CA); Celinda Lake, President Lake Research Partners; Witold Skwierczynski, President, National Council of SSA Field Operations Locals, Council 220, American Federation of Government Employees; Steve Hill, Director of Retirement Security Campaigns, SEIU; and Nancy Olumekor, Director, American Postal Workers Union Retiree Department.  

“Social Security and Medicare represent a promise America has made to all those participating in this system,” said Senator Van Hollen. “Americans overwhelmingly want to strengthen these essential lifelines. I strongly support efforts to ensure that these programs can increase benefits and continue to deliver financial security for generations to come.”

Representative Larson said the poll underscores popular support for the kinds of measures he proposes in his Social Security 2100 Act, which keeps the program solvent into the next century while increasing benefits.  “Social Security is not an entitlement; it’s insurance we paid for,” said Larson.  “Let’s say to President Trump:  join us in protecting and expanding Social Security.”

Representative Tony Cardenas (D-CA) made an emotional plea to preserve the two programs by citing a family story. “My grandson’s great-grandmother was saved by Medicare.  It’s a matter of dignity and life.”  He railed against proposals to privatize social insurance programs.  “Do we value dignity? Do we value life?  Make our President and our Congress commit that they will not take it away from you!”

OTHER HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE POLL:

o   74% favor gradually requiring employees and employers to pay Social Security taxes on wages above $127K, including majorities across party lines.

o   75% favor including a Social Security benefits credit for up to five years of time spent outside the paid workforce caring for young children, aging seniors, or family members with disabilities.

o   65% oppose raising the Medicare eligibility age to 67.

The poll of 800 likely voters nationwide was commissioned by the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare and conducted by Lake Research Partners from January 4 to January 7, 2017. The poll was co-sponsored by the American Federation of Government Employees, American Postal Workers Union, Service Employees International Union and the United Steelworkers.

 

Why Seniors Should Care About Obamacare Repeal

There’s a great piece in the current Money magazine by Elizabeth O’Brien about the impact of ACA repeal on seniors.  The title alone makes it worth the read:  “Think Changes to Obamacare Won’t Affect You?  Think Again.”   In this article, O’Brien lays bare the consequences of ACA repeal to seniors, who, as the title implies, may not be aware of the repercussions for Medicare.

"The Affordable Care Act contains about 165 provisions affecting Medicare, according to Medicare's trustees. These range from improving benefits for the 57 million current beneficiaries to shoring up the program’s long-term finances for future ones.

These provisions include free wellness visits and preventative screenings for cancer, diabetes, heart disease and a host of other medical conditions – with no out of pocket costs – all of which could disappear if the ACA is repealed.  Likewise with the prescription drug “donut hole,” which the ACA was closing, saving the average beneficiary $1,000 a year.  As O’Brien notes, before Obamacare came along:

"More than three million beneficiaries hit the donut hole before the law took effect, and some [seniors] were forced to skip doses, split pills, or not fill their prescriptions at all due to high costs.

Who wants to go back to seniors splitting pills or going without their medicines?  

O’Brien also points out that because of the savings the ACA provided to Medicare, repealing the healthcare law will cost Medicare $802 billion between now and 2025.  There’s also a strong refutation of the argument by House Speaker Paul Ryan and HHS Nominee Tom Price that Medicare is “going broke,” which they will use as a canard to cut benefits.

Most tellingly, the Republicans are gunning for tax provisions that help pay for the ACA which mainly affect the upper middle class and the wealthy.  O’Brien quotes Matthew Yglesias of Vox:

"Republicans’ desire to eliminate these taxes is a big driver of their push to repeal Obamacare. Subsidizing the health care costs of working-class people is expensive, and while Democrats want rich people to pay the freight for doing it, Republicans do not."

The bottom line:  seniors and millions of newly insured Americans will pay more for healthcare – or go without it entirely – so that high earners can get a tax break. 




   

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