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Breaking the Glass Ceiling

The U.S. workforce looked very different in 1946, at the start of the Baby Boom generation, than it does today. A big part of this workforce transformation has been due to the contributions of women. Starting with very low labor-force participation rates in the immediate post-World War II period, women today participate in the labor-force at a much higher rate, although still lower than that of men. While it is true that some women have broken through the glass ceiling and have entered the corporate board rooms of some of our largest and most successful companies, inequities remain. An enduring pay gap, under which women earn 19 percent less than men1 means lower lifetime earnings for many women.

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