Social Security Targeted on Day One of New Congress

2015-01-06T15:24:00+00:00January 6th, 2015|News Archives 2015|

January 6, 2015

News Release

“Today’s unprecedented House proposal preventing a routine rebalancing of the Social Security Disability Trust Funds puts politics ahead of policy and partisanship ahead of people.  This House Rules change would allow a 20% benefit cut for millions of disabled Americans unless there are broader Social Security benefit cuts or tax increases improving the solvency of the combined trust funds.  It is difficult to believe that there is any purpose to this unprecedented change to House Rules other than to cut benefits for Americans who have worked hard all their lives, paid into Social Security, and rely on their Social Security benefits, including Disability, in order to survive. 

A modest and temporary reallocation of part of the 6.2 percent Social Security tax rate to the DI Trust Fund would put the entire Social Security program on an equal footing, with all benefits payable at least until 2033.  Democrats and Republicans have authorized this same strategy eleven times without controversy (including four times during the Reagan administration); however, this new House majority would rather play politics with the livelihoods of millions of Americans than solve this important funding issue.  This sends a clear message to middle-class families about the House majority’s priorities — targeting Social Security for cuts clearly ranks high on their list.”…Max Richtman, NCPSSM President/CEO

 

Max Richtman’s full letter to Congress can be read here.

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The National Committee, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization acts in the interests of its membership through advocacy, education, services, grassroots efforts and the leadership of the Board of Directors and professional staff. The work of the National Committee is directed toward developing better-informed citizens and voters.

Media Inquiries to:

Pamela Causey 202-216-8378/202-236-2123

Kim Wright 202-216-8414 www.ncpssm.org