Let us not speak of pigs and lipstick, but simply say that the freshly tweaked GOP health care bill introduced last night still socks it to older Americans. In an attempt to throw bones to both moderate Republicans and Tea Partiers, Speaker Paul Ryan has come up with a revised bill that’s even worse than the original for seniors and “near seniors” (under 64 years of age).  The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities has just released a detailed analysis forecasting higher net premiums, co-pays, and out-of-pocket costs for older Americans under the revised bill.  Here is our own take on why there's nothing to like in the tweaked legislation: 

 

MEDICAID

 

Millions of seniors depend on Medicaid to cover the cost of long-term care, while low income Americans 50-64 rely on the program for basic health care.  The original GOP bill cut nearly $1 trillion from Medicaid and imposed per capita caps on federal payments to the states.  The revised legislation adds another insidious idea to the equation by introducing block grants, where states can decide to curtail or outright cut certain services.  Per capita caps and block grants mean one thing:  less funding for older patients who need medical services and long-term care - and in some cases, complete loss of coverage.  For seniors, It’s two bad ideas in one bill.

 

AGE RATING

 

The revised GOP bill does nothing to address a major problem with the original.  Under the revised legislation, Insurance companies would still be able charge older Americans up to five times as much as people in their 20s (a practice referred to as “age rating”), one reason why the Congressional Budget Office estimated that 24 million people would lose coverage under the Republican plan.

 

 

PREMIUM SUPPORT         

 

Obamacare provided generous subsidies to people who couldn’t afford private insurance premiums.  The GOP bill replaced those subsidies with paltry tax credits that discriminate against older patients.  Paul Ryan’s tweaked version kicks the problem over to the Senate by authorizing the upper chamber to increase tax credits for older Americans… if it wants to. There’s no guarantee the Senate will actually do this, or that fatter tax credits will make it into the final bill.  Once again, the revised GOP plan leaves older folks worse off.

 

TAX CUTS

 

While giving nothing to seniors, the revised bill still repeals $600 billion in tax cuts for the wealthy (and $24 billion for pharmaceutical companies) that Obamacare utilized to expand health coverage and strengthen Medicare.  The tweaked bill actually sweetens the deal for the wealthy – repealing the taxes in 2017 instead of 2018.

 

 

MEDICARE

 

The GOP plan still weakens Medicare through the repeal of a 0.9% tax on income over $200,000.  By rescinding the tax, the GOP plan reduces the solvency of Medicare by 3 years – and the revised bill does nothing to lengthen it.  Reducing Medicare’s solvency gives budget hawks an excuse to privatize and cut the program, which hurts seniors.

 

We don’t know whether the dressed-up GOP plan will pass the House.  It’s possible that the concessions to Tea Partiers and token gestures to moderates – plus active lobbying on President Trump’s part – will allow it to squeak by.  Either way, Speaker Ryan squandered an opportunity to reverse some of the damage to healthcare and long-term care for our older and most vulnerable citizens.