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From the monthly archives: August 2017

We are pleased to present below all posts archived in 'August 2017'. If you still can't find what you are looking for, try using the search box.

Coming soon to a pharmacy or grocery store near you: Hi-Quality Over the Counter Hearing Aids

Seniors suffering from hearing loss have good reason to cheer. They should soon be able to purchase quality hearing aids over the counter. The Over the Counter (OTC) Hearing Aid Act of 2017 is poised to become law.  Passed by Congress this summer, the Act authorizes the FDA to create a new category of regulated, over the counter hearing aids.  With 30 million Americans (and 4 in 5 seniors) experiencing hearing loss, this is sweet relief for seniors’ pocketbooks and overall health.

Prescription hearing aids can cost as much as $2,500 each (or $5,000 a pair).  The hefty price tag can be a severe strain for seniors living on fixed incomes, especially since Medicare does not cover hearing aids. That’s why some 70% of Americans between age 65 and 84 with hearing loss are not using hearing aids.  They simply cannot afford to. 

The anticipated new generation of OTC hearing aids – meant for people with “mild to moderate” hearing loss – will retail for a fraction of the prescription price:

“By opening the market to OTC aids, manufacturers of consumer electronics --- from giants such as Apple and Samsung to small startups --- could enter the hearing aid space and sell directly to consumers… [at a retail price] between $150 and 299.” - The Hill Newspaper

Imagine being able to buy high-quality hearing aids at your local pharmacy or grocery store for as little as $150, bypassing the time-consuming and expensive process of acquiring them from an audiologist.  Of course, those with more serious hearing impairment will and should continue to seek prescription hearing aids through a specialist.

As we discussed yesterday on Facebook Live, this is not just a matter of personal cost.  It’s a public health issue. Hearing loss is a gateway to other potential medical problems – including fatigue, stress, depression and memory loss.  Access to affordable, high-quality OTC hearing aids means that millions of seniors will likely be able to hear better and stay healthier.

National Committee President Max Richtman hailed the new law as a victory for seniors and all Americans with hearing impairment:

“As someone who suffers from hearing loss, I understand what this new law means for seniors’ health – and their pocketbooks.  While we hope that Medicare will eventually cover hearing aids, the OTC Hearing Aid Act is a common sense, compassionate measure that will improve seniors’ access to quality devices.” – Max Richtman, President of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare

The new law is the product of the kind of bipartisanship that most Americans yearn for.  It was cosponsored by Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Charles Grassley (R-IA). The House bill was cosponsored by Democratic representative Joe Kennedy III and Republican Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn. The Over the Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 proves that, under the right circumstances, sensible members of both parties can come together to improve the lives of ordinary Americans.

FDR's Grandson on Social Security... Which Turns 82 Today

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Social Security into law on this day in 1935 to provide seniors with basic income security after retirement, mitigating against the “vicissitudes and hazards of life.” Eighty-two years later, the program he created has kept several generations of seniors – and their families – out of poverty.  In turn, the nation is very fortunate to have had several generations of Roosevelts dedicated to preserving Social Security. 

Franklin Roosevelt’s son, Congressman James Roosevelt, Sr., founded the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare in 1982 to protect the financial security, health, and well-being of current and future generations of Americans.  FDR’s grandson, James (“Jim”) Roosevelt, Jr., carries on his family’s legacy as a leading healthcare advocate and vice-chair of the National Committee’s Advisory Board. 

Last March, Jim Roosevelt sat down with National Committee President Max Richtman for a wide-ranging Facebook Live interview.  We have included some highlights of that interview below as we look at the legacy of Social Security on its 82nd anniversary.

Jim’s grandfather, President Franklin Roosevelt, became inspired to create a national retirement insurance program after seeing older Americans relegated to the poor houses because they had no means of supporting themselves. “It tears my heart to see those old men and women there,” said then-Governor Roosevelt after visiting the poor houses of New York state.  As Jim Roosevelt explained, FDR felt that seniors deserved an assurance of fundamental financial security.

He believed (and we still believe) that Social Security is basic to the lives of the American people. And he was very clear that it was a family program.  It was created not only so that people, when they reach retirement age, have enough money for the basics of a decent life. It’s also so that their children don’t have to spend down their money to take care of them. – Jim Roosevelt

Working with Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins, FDR pushed the Social Security Act of 1935 through Congress at the height of the Great Depression.  To some, it was counterintuitive that  President Roosevelt put such a high priority on retirement insurance at a time when so many millions of Americans couldn’t find work.  But Jim Roosevelt told us that FDR viewed retirement security and employment as inextricably linked.

People said to my grandfather, “Why are you worrying about people’s retirement when people need jobs?”  And he said these are tied together. If people have jobs, they can pay into Social Security knowing that they’ll have benefits later on.  Life is then worth living, work is worth doing.  And I think that’s what has remained the vision for me, for my father, and for the National Committee over these past 30 years. – Jim Roosevelt

It was very important to President Roosevelt that Social Security be funded directly through workers’ payroll contributions.  FDR said that payroll contributions would give retirees “the legal, moral, and political right” to collect their Social Security benefits. He knew that a perpetually self-funded program would guarantee Social Security’s endurance for generations to come, and protect the program from the whims of politicians who might seek to undermine it

The reason that Social Security is structured the way it is is so that nobody, just for political reasons, can cut Social Security out of the budget or out of the law.  Because Social Security has its own dedicated income stream from the payroll tax, we don’t just trade if off against education or defense or other important things.  My grandfather famously said, “With those taxes in there, no damn politician can ever scrap my Social Security program.”  That’s as true today as it was in 1935. – Jim Roosevelt

President Roosevelt’s vision has most certainly endured. Today, Social Security provides some 61 million Americans and their families with basic financial security upon retirement or disability.  For older Americans, Social Security can mean the difference between financial well-being and poverty.  Two out of three seniors rely on Social Security for most of their income, and one-third of seniors depend on it for at least 90% of their income. Public polling consistently shows that Social Security enjoys overwhelming support from majorities of Americans across party lines.

Over the years, Social Security has been modified (with bipartisan support) to expand benefits and keep the system financially sound. This year, Social Security has come under new threat from budget hawks in the Trump administration and on Capitol Hill.  But as generations of Roosevelts have shown us, Social Security is worth fighting for.  On this, Social Security’s 82nd anniversary, we at the National Committee recommit ourselves to preserving this landmark program for current and future generations of Americans.

Watch our full interview with Jim Roosevelt on Facebook Live

Summertime No Time to Stop Protecting Seniors' Healthcare

Washington, D.C. is noticeably mellower with Congress beginning its August recess.  Our “worst-in-the-U.S.” traffic is noticeably lighter.  The sidewalks are emptier.  The news from Capitol Hill has slowed to a trickle.  But the summer doldrums are no time for advocates here in D.C. or the 50 states to let our guard down.  (We just discussed this on "Behind the Headlines" from Capitol Hill on Facebook Live.) 

Last week, we narrowly escaped the passage of healthcare legislation that would have been devastating for poorer, older, and sicker Americans. The heroism of three GOP Senators and a united Democratic party pulled us back from the brink by voting against the latest Obamacare repeal bill.  

Make no mistake, intense grassroots activism in Congressional districts across the country played no small part in the defeat of repeal legislation in both houses of Congress.  From New Hampshire to Nevada, everyday Americans challenged their elected representatives to protect their healthcare – and won in a heart-pounding showdown.  

In the end, only Senators Collins, Murkowski, and McCain had the courage to defy party leadership and do the right thing.  That’s a thin reed on which to hang future hopes.  If a single one of those votes had gone the other way, at least 22 million Americans would have been well on their way to losing healthcare coverage – and the Medicaid program would have been decimated.  In fact, it’s disappointing that some of the Republican moderates who seemed to oppose the various repeal bills voted yes in the end.  Perhaps it’s because Senator McCain’s no vote gave them cover.  But where is the courage in that?

While Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says it’s time to “move on,” Speaker Paul Ryan signaled that the House isn’t done trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act.   Meanwhile, President Trump continues to threaten to cut off crucial cost-sharing payments, spooking insurers and threatening to drive up premiums.  As Phil Moeller pointed out in his column for PBS NewsHour, there’s a real danger that the majority party will re-attack Obamacare after August recess ends.  

With Capitol Hill’s largely silent and long-postponed summer vacations underway, there is little appetite for re-engaging in nasty policy fights. But when the leaders and their troops are rested, there is little doubt that [they] will be back at it again. – Phil Moeller, PBS NewsHour

This means that we in the advocacy community cannot simply relax this month – tempting as that may be.  Advocates and everyday activists must continue to deliver the message to our elected representatives that it’s time to stop trying to destroy the Affordable Care Act and work across the aisle to improve it, as National Committee President Max Richtman argued in The Hill newspaper this week.  We must maintain the drumbeat whenever and wherever we encounter members of Congress this summer:  at their district offices, by phone, by email, or around town.

Make no mistake:  the activism we saw last winter and spring made a difference.  Members of Congress heard their constituents loud and clear at contentious town halls.  Phone lines, fax lines, and email accounts were jammed. Congress heard us when we said “Hands Off Our Healthcare!”

But even after all that full-throated activism, several GOP moderates in the House and Senate still caved when it was time to cast crucial votes. We came dangerously close to losing the Affordable Care Act. If anything, we must step up our activism.  We must make the case for protecting the healthcare of seniors – and all Americans – even more vociferously, letting our leaders know in personal terms the true impact of changes to our healthcare coverage. But we must also demand that our elected representatives talk to us. Hold town halls, don’t cancel them.  Keep phone lines open instead of shutting them down.  Hear us instead of hiding. And if there are future votes to undermine our healthcare, we must insist that more GOP moderates stick to their stated principles instead of running with the herd.





   

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