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Why Silence Isn’t Golden for Millions in Medicare

Nearly 30 million Americans suffer from hearing loss yet a small percentage have hearing aids.  Why? Many simply can’t afford the high cost...and Medicare does not cover hearing aids and related audiology services. 

Currently, Medicare Part B only covers hearing rehabilitation services for cases caused by an illness or accident. Progressive, age-related hearing loss is not covered, leaving many seniors to pay for their own hearing exams and hearing aids. Hearing aids are incredibly expensive, ranging from $600 to over $5,000 each. These high price tags discourage many seniors from seeking a very basic solution that could dramatically improve their lives.

Research shows even mild hearing loss can double the risk of dementia.  Untreated hearing loss also contributes to balance problems and falls, isolation, depression and a greater incidence of stress-related diseases like diabetes and heart disease.  Earlier this month, a Report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine found that hearing loss is a public health priority requiring national attention.

That’s why the National Committee is proud to join the Center for Medicare Advocacy, Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), Rep. Jim McDermott (D-WA) and hearing expert Frank R. Lin, M.D., in a briefing today on the need to expand Medicare to include hearing aids and treatment:

“Intervention would reduce the risks which come with hearing loss. This is hugely important in the case of dementia which, with the aging of the baby boomers, is a massive public health issue now.  Hearing loss may be one of the few modifiable risk factors that could reduce the risk of dementia; however, hearing health care is still broadly inaccessible and expensive.”...Dr. Frank Lin, M.D., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health

“As always, there will be the critics who say “we can’t afford this” Well, yes we can. When the Affordable Care Act passed, 716 billion dollars in savings from Medicare were plowed right back into the program to provide expanded services such as preventive care and screenings at no cost to beneficiaries. And there are strategies such as restoring the pharmaceutical drug company rebates for medicines prescribed to dual-eligibles, people on both Medicare and Medicaid, which, according to CBO, could generate 121 billion dollars over ten years. If the Congressional will is there, we know it can be done.”...Max Richtman, NCPSSM President/CEO


Legislation introduced by Reps. Debbie Dingell (H.R. 1653), Jim McDermott (H.R. 5396) and Alan Grayson (H.R.3308) would close this gap in Medicare coverage. This legislation is vital to the health security of millions of Americans.

“Since its implementation in 1965, Medicare has enhanced health care for millions of Americans. But there are still major gaps in coverage. Given the growing numbers of older Americans who suffer from hearing loss, it’s time for that to change,” said Judith Stein, J.D., Executive Director of the Center for Medicare Advocacy.

"We don’t know exactly how much we spend on cases where we’re dealing with depression because they’re isolated...and hearing loss contributes to both. It’s absolutely critical that for an acceptable quality of life that people need to be able to hear the world around them.  In order for seniors to keep a good quality of live, just keeping them alive isn’t enough, we must have good hearing and dental care. This is not beyond our capacity to provide this for seniors.”...Rep. Jim McDermott (D-WA) 

“We’ve got millions of Americans over 45 effected by hearing loss. If untreated it has devastating impacts on our nation.  Medicare coverage should include audiology care, period. The promise of Medicare to keep Americans healthy is at stake.  Medicare should cover all the vital health needs of seniors. Why are we arbitrarily leaving some out?  There’s no reason for Medicare to remove the head from the body.”...Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT)


Please call your Member of Congress or Sign our Congressional Petition today and tell them:

  We need hearing care coverage in Medicare.

(800) 998-0180

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Why Silence Isn’t Golden for Millions in Medicare

Nearly 30 million Americans suffer from hearing loss yet a small percentage have hearing aids.  Why? Many simply can’t afford the high cost...and Medicare does not cover hearing aids and related audiology services. 

Currently, Medicare Part B only covers hearing rehabilitation services for cases caused by an illness or accident. Progressive, age-related hearing loss is not covered, leaving many seniors to pay for their own hearing exams and hearing aids. Hearing aids are incredibly expensive, ranging from $600 to over $5,000 each. These high price tags discourage many seniors from seeking a very basic solution that could dramatically improve their lives.

Research shows even mild hearing loss can double the risk of dementia.  Untreated hearing loss also contributes to balance problems and falls, isolation, depression and a greater incidence of stress-related diseases like diabetes and heart disease.  Earlier this month, a Report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine found that hearing loss is a public health priority requiring national attention.

That’s why the National Committee is proud to join the Center for Medicare Advocacy, Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), Rep. Jim McDermott (D-WA) and hearing expert Frank R. Lin, M.D., in a briefing today on the need to expand Medicare to include hearing aids and treatment:

“Intervention would reduce the risks which come with hearing loss. This is hugely important in the case of dementia which, with the aging of the baby boomers, is a massive public health issue now.  Hearing loss may be one of the few modifiable risk factors that could reduce the risk of dementia; however, hearing health care is still broadly inaccessible and expensive.”...Dr. Frank Lin, M.D., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health

“As always, there will be the critics who say “we can’t afford this” Well, yes we can. When the Affordable Care Act passed, 716 billion dollars in savings from Medicare were plowed right back into the program to provide expanded services such as preventive care and screenings at no cost to beneficiaries. And there are strategies such as restoring the pharmaceutical drug company rebates for medicines prescribed to dual-eligibles, people on both Medicare and Medicaid, which, according to CBO, could generate 121 billion dollars over ten years. If the Congressional will is there, we know it can be done.”...Max Richtman, NCPSSM President/CEO


Legislation introduced by Reps. Debbie Dingell (H.R. 1653), Jim McDermott (H.R. 5396) and Alan Grayson (H.R.3308) would close this gap in Medicare coverage. This legislation is vital to the health security of millions of Americans.

“Since its implementation in 1965, Medicare has enhanced health care for millions of Americans. But there are still major gaps in coverage. Given the growing numbers of older Americans who suffer from hearing loss, it’s time for that to change,” said Judith Stein, J.D., Executive Director of the Center for Medicare Advocacy.

"We don’t know exactly how much we spend on cases where we’re dealing with depression because they’re isolated...and hearing loss contributes to both. It’s absolutely critical that for an acceptable quality of life that people need to be able to hear the world around them.  In order for seniors to keep a good quality of live, just keeping them alive isn’t enough, we must have good hearing and dental care. This is not beyond our capacity to provide this for seniors.”...Rep. Jim McDermott (D-WA) 

“We’ve got millions of Americans over 45 effected by hearing loss. If untreated it has devastating impacts on our nation.  Medicare coverage should include audiology care, period. The promise of Medicare to keep Americans healthy is at stake.  Medicare should cover all the vital health needs of seniors. Why are we arbitrarily leaving some out?  There’s no reason for Medicare to remove the head from the body.”...Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT)


Please call your Member of Congress or Sign our Congressional Petition today and tell them:

  We need hearing care coverage in Medicare.

(800) 998-0180

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Clinton vs Trump – What That Means for Social Security & Medicare

As Hillary Clinton declared victory after winning four of the six primaries last night, the Democratic ticket for President solidified.  While Donald Trump has been in that position for a while now, his campaign has now entered rough political waters...again. 

And so it will likely go until November...

Unfortunately, what’s lost as the media and political punditry focus on the horserace, who’s stuck their foot in it today and the inevitable mud-slinging that Trump has already promised to begin on Monday, are the important policy differences between candidates.  There are plenty of them, especially on economic issues impacting average Americans.

Bernie Sanders’ campaign ensured that issues of income inequality, economic security and fairness, social justice and boosting Social Security remained top of the political agenda.  He vowed to continue that effort:

“Our campaign from day one has understood some very basic points and that is first, we will not allow right-wing Republicans to control our government. And that is especially true with Donald Trump as the Republican candidate. The American people, in my view, will never support a candidate whose major theme is bigotry, who insults Mexicans, who insults Muslims and women, and African-Americans. 

But we understand that our mission is more than just defeating Trump; it is transforming our country. The vast — the vast majority of the American people know that it is not acceptable that the top one-tenth of 1 percent owns almost as much as wealth as the bottom 90 percent. We are going to change that. And when millions of Americans are working longer hours for lower wages, we will not allow 57 percent of all new income to go to the top 1 percent...

We will not allow Donald Trump to become President of the United States."

When it comes to Social Security and Medicare, the differences between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are stark. Clinton supports expanding benefits, while Trump promises he won’t cut Social Security. That position has given the GOP party establishment heartburn but Trump has repeatedly acknowledged the GOP can’t win by promising benefit cuts and so he’s not:

"As Republicans, if you think you are going to change very substantially for the worse Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security in any substantial way, and at the same time you think you are going to win elections, it just really is not going to happen," Mr. Trump said, adding that polls show that tea partyers are among those who don't want their entitlements changed."  Donald Trump, 2013 CPAC speech, Washington Times

You know the Republicans also have to get elected, you do know that. And if you watch Bernie, and if you watch Hillary, they don't only want to not cut, they want to increase Social Security.” Donald Trump, Morning Joe, February 2016

And yet his policy staff says the Trump administration is open to “entitlement changes.”

“After the administration has been in place, then we will start to take a look at all of the programs, including entitlement programs like Social Security and Medicare. We’ll start taking a hard look at those to start seeing what we can do in a bipartisan way.”

“...I think that whoever [is] the next president is going to have a horrible time in dealing with this, because those entitlements will race to the front of all the economic issues we have in this country.”  Sam Clovis, Trump campaign Chief Policy Advisor, May 2016

You can read more about the Trump campaign positions here, here and here.

Hillary Clinton has a long history of fighting the privatization of Social Security and Medicare, something Donald Trump supported in his first Presidential campaign. These days, that position alone is not enough but Clinton has also articulated a real plan to boost benefits, provide caregiving credits, lift the payroll tax cap and improve spousal benefits. She also opposes Trump’s plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act which means seniors in Medicare would lose billions in drug savings, well-care visits, lower premiums and improved care. 

There will be many more months to draw clear comparisons between these candidates’ positions on Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid as the Presidential campaign moves to the conventions and their platform debates

The National Committee’s SeniorVote 2016 will keep you updated and candidates’ accountable on their plans for programs which touch the lives of virtually every American family.You can sign up for email alerts to be sure the latest news comes straight to your mailbox. 

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Ryan Says Trump Will Promote House Agenda -- You Know What That Means for Medicare!

No one was really surprised when House Speaker Paul Ryan lined up behind the rest of the GOP party leadership to endorse Donald Trump.  It’s also not too surprising that Ryan is confident Trump will support the Ryan/House agenda, regardless of his pesky campaign promises to leave seniors’ programs alone:

“We’ve discussed how the House can be a driver of policy ideas. We’ve talked about how important these reforms are to saving our country. Through these conversations, I feel confident he would help us turn the ideas in this agenda into laws to help improve people’s lives. That’s why I’ll be voting for him this fall.”...Rep. Paul Ryan

Modern Healthcare says:

“Last month, I raised the question of whether Trump would follow the politically risky healthcare policy path Ryan has blazed on Medicare, Medicaid and other big issues.

The House speaker apparently has concluded that he would.

Ryan
 has spearheaded a series of partisan House budget outlines that would significantly restructure Medicare and Medicaid and sharply reduce federal spending on those two programs. The Wisconsin Republican wants to convert Medicare into a defined-contribution, voucher-style program and change Medicaid into a capped state block grant program. Some experts say the plan would impose significantly higher costs on seniors.”

Let’s not forget that it’s already been reported by sources in on the Ryan/Trump Capitol Hill meeting that cutting Social Security and Medicare was something Trump could “morally support”.  He just doesn’t think he can win if he says it.

“From a moral standpoint, I believe in it,” Trump told Ryan. “But you also have to get elected. And there’s no way a Republican is going to beat a Democrat when the Republican is saying, ‘We’re going to cut your Social Security’ and the Democrat is saying, ‘We’re going to keep it and give you more.’ ”

Which also fits with the message his campaign staff delivered to fiscal hawks at last month’s annual Pete Peterson “how to cut middle-class benefits” soiree:

“After the administration has been in place, then we will start to take a look at all of the programs, including entitlement programs like Social Security and Medicare. We’ll start taking a hard look at those to start seeing what we can do in a bipartisan way.”

 

“...I think that whoever [is] the next president is going to have a horrible time in dealing with this, because those entitlements will race to the front of all the economic issues we have in this country.”...Sam Clovis, Trump campaign chief policy advisor.

So, while Trump’s actual plans for Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid remain ever-elusive Paul Ryan’s plans for these programs – which he apparently believes President Trump will deliver on – are very clear

“The House GOP’s budget would privatize Medicare with a voucher plan, leaving seniors and the disabled – some of our most vulnerable Americans – hostage to the whims of private insurance companies.  Over time, this will end traditional Medicare and make it harder for seniors to choose their own doctor.  Vouchers will not keep up with the increasing cost of health insurance… that is why seniors will pay more.  Incredibly, the GOP budget also tries to have it both ways by counting the savings in Medicare since the passage of health care reform and then repealing the law that delivered those same savings. Seniors need to pay careful attention to this next fact: if the GOP isn’t stopped from repealing healthcare reform, Medicare beneficiaries would immediately lose billions in prescription drug savings, wellness visits and preventative services with no out-of-pocket costs, and years of solvency will be lost to the Medicare program.” ...Max Richtman, NCPSSM President/CEO.

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The Cruz/Fiorina Plan for Social Security and Medicare

Here’s a “Throwback Thursday” reminder of what a Cruz/Fiorina administration would mean for millions of Americans and their families who depend on Social Security and Medicare.

...at least what they’ll admit to today, anyway.  


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