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From the category archives: Retirement

The Cruz/Fiorina Plan for Social Security and Medicare

Here’s a “Throwback Thursday” reminder of what a Cruz/Fiorina administration would mean for millions of Americans and their families who depend on Social Security and Medicare.

...at least what they’ll admit to today, anyway.  


Unequal Pay’s Lasting Legacy: Lost Income from Your 1st day at Work until the Day You Die

Max Richtman, NCPSSM President/CEOMax Richtman, NCPSSM President/CEO

It’s certainly not news that American women continue to earn less than men for the same work, typically 79 cents on the dollar.  But what’s less understood is the devastating impact those lost wages have over time.  In fact, over a working woman’s career, that pay gap could accumulate to a half million dollars in lost income and even more for women of color.  A comprehensive analysis of gender pay inequality, released by the Joint Economic Committee’s Democratic staff, shows how the gender pay gap grows over time.  It’s not just an issue for working women because this inequality can also have a compounding and devastating impact on retired women.

The thought of running out of money in retirement keeps 57% of women awake at night. That’s not a surprise when you consider the many combined factors which make retirement especially challenging for American women. Women earn less than men even when doing the same jobs, they more often work part-time or in jobs that do not offer retirement savings plans, and they tend to spend more time out of the workforce as a consequence of their caregiving responsibilities. Women could lose $430,480 in earnings over the course of a 40-year career due to the wage gap alone.  For Latinas the career losses mount to $1,007,080, and for African American women the losses are $877,480. Lower career earnings also translate to fewer savings for many women in retirement. At the same time, their longer lifespan and higher chances of disability means that they will have higher retirement costs, both for everyday expenses and necessary medical care.

These financial obstacles facing older women explain why women are 80% more likely than men to be impoverished at age 65 and over. The median income of women age 65 and older is 44% lower than the median income of men of the same age and that poverty gap widens over time due to decreasing income for women at older ages. Women aged 75 to 79 are three times as likely and those over the age of 80 are twice as likely to live in poverty compared to men. While it’s self-evident that working women must be aware of the unique challenges they could face in retirement, simply understanding these issues won’t be enough to bridge the very real gap created by systemic and demographic forces far beyond their control.  That’s why the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare launched our Eleanor’s Hope initiative.  We’re not only educating but also advocating for legislation that addresses the inequities threatening millions of retired women while also working to elect lawmakers who share our vision of retirement equity for women. 

There are a number of proposals which, if adopted, could significantly level the playing field for women and reduce the threat of poverty in their old age: 

Gender Pay Equity. Eliminating the wage gap that limits women’s earnings is essential to helping our daughters and granddaughters save for their own retirement. Congress should strengthen and reform the “Equal Pay Act” by putting an end to pay secrecy, strengthening workers’ ability to challenge discrimination and bringing equal pay law into line with other civil rights laws.  

Caregiver Credit. Compute the Social Security benefit by giving an annual caregiver credit for each year of caregiving so that total earnings for the year would equal 50 percent of that year’s average annual wage. Caregiving service years would be those in which an individual provides care to children under the age of six or to elderly or disabled family members. Up to five family service years could be granted to any worker.

Improve Survivor Benefits. Increase the benefit paid to a surviving spouse to an amount that is equal to 75 percent of the total combined benefits that were paid to the couple prior to the spouse’s death, capped at the benefit level of a lifelong average earner.

Consumer Price Index for the Elderly. Adopt the Consumer Price Index for The Elderly (CPI-E) for the purpose of determining the amount of the cost-of living adjustment (COLA) adjustment for Social Security benefits. This is especially important for women who tend to receive benefits longer because they live longer.

It’s been more than 50 years since our nation acknowledged and attempted to address, with passage of the Equal Pay Act, the gender wage gap which unfairly targets half of our population with billions in lost wages.   Yet, at the current rate of change, it will take another 40 years to close that gap.   That’s simply not an option for generations of American women who will continue to face the consequences of income inequality from their very first day on the job until they die.  

The Retirement Security Gap Between America’s Rich and Poor Continues to Grow

New GAO Report Provides Startling Details on Disparities and Their Impact 

on Social Security Benefits


Growing disparities in life expectancy between America’s rich and poor are eroding the progressive nature of Social Security. A new Government Accountability Office (GAO) report, requested by Senator Bernie Sanders, shows that low-income American men will lose 11%-14% of their lifetime Social Security benefits while high-income men will see a 16%-18% benefit boost due to this growing gap.

“This report is especially important when you consider the political push to raise Social Security’s retirement age to reduce benefits.  Forcing average Americans to delay retirement until 70, as suggested by some in Washington, would mean even smaller benefits for lower-income groups.

The National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare has long opposed increasing the Social Security retirement age as nothing but a cruel cut in benefits, and this GAO report shows exactly how cruel it would be.  Instead of cutting Social Security, Congress should boost benefits so that Social Security can continue to fulfill its promise providing an adequate base of income for America’s seniors.  Our thanks to Senator Sanders for his strong leadership in requesting this important report. It’s a must-read for any candidate who truly cares about keeping America’s promise of retirement security.”...Max Richtman, NCPSSM President/CEO

America’s wealthiest are not only living longer and collecting more Social Security benefits, they are also contributing less to the program than at any time in recent history. In the past, the Social Security tax cap has been set at a level that covered about 90 percent of all earnings. Currently, however, only about 83 percent of earnings are subject to the Social Security payroll tax. This means the wealthy, who’ve benefited from disproportionate wage growth, have also been exempt from paying into Social Security on those gains above the $118,500 cap.

The National Committee supports legislation, including Senator Sanders’ “Social Security Expansion Act”, which would lift the payroll tax cap, boost benefits and adopt a cost of living formula for seniors. 

You can read the GAO report here.

The Economic Crisis Candidates Continue to Ignore

The Economic Policy Institute’s “The State of American Retirement” combined with the National Institute on Retirement Security’s new report on women and retirement paint a very clear picture of a nation on the brink of an economic crisis that will devastate millions of average American families, if Washington continues to turn a blind eye.

The median family between the ages of 32 and 61 has only $5,000 saved in a retirement account, while the top 1 percent of families has a million dollars or more. For many groups—lower-income, black, Hispanic, non-college-educated, and unmarried—the typical working-age family has no savings at all in these accounts....The State of American Retirement.

“Our retirement system used to reduce inequality, but since the shift to 401(k)s it has only served to magnify it. These accounts are accidents of history that were never designed to replace pensions, and it should come as no surprise that they have not worked for the majority of people.” ...Monique Morrissey, EPI Economist

The numbers are stark:

  • Nearly half of all working-age families have zero retirement savings.
  • Almost nine in 10 families in the top income fifth have savings in retirement accounts, compared to fewer than one in 10 families in the bottom income fifth.
  • Only 41 percent of black families and 26 percent of Hispanic families have retirement account savings, compared with 65 percent of white non-Hispanic families.
  • Only married couples are more likely than not to have retirement account savings.

News that the income inequality hindering American workers now is also carrying over to their retirement is alarming for future generations who are taking an economic hit at every stage of life.  For women, the retirement picture is even worse. 

“A new analysis finds that women are 80% likely than men to be impoverished in retirement. The National Institute on Retirement Security (NIRS) finds that across all age groups, women have substantially less income in retirement than men. For women age 65 and older, the data indicate that their typical income is 25 percent lower than men. As men and women age, men’s income advantage widens to 44 percent by age 80 and older. Consequently, women were 80 percent more likely than men to be impoverished at age 65 and older, while women age 75 to 79 were three times more likely to fall below the poverty level as compared to their male counterparts.”... National Institute on Retirement Security

Just as we’ve seen from climate change deniers, many Republican politicians won’t even acknowledge the retirement crisis exists because improving the nation’s most successful federal retirement programs is anathema to their misguided belief that Wall Street should be handling your savings and for-profit insurance companies managing your health. Instead of supporting proposals to improve the backbone of America’s retirement system, Social Security and Medicare, conservatives continue their campaign to privatize and cut. 

There are legislative proposals which would improve Americans’ retirement picture but they are languishing in the GOP controlled Congress.  You can see many of these proposals on our Legislative tracker.  We also continue to advocate for meaning changes impacting retirement security for women.  Please take a moment and see those details on our Eleanor’s Hope initiative website. 

USA Today Gets it All Wrong on Social Security

Opinion editors at USA Today wrote an editorial today that, unfortunately, read much like the billion dollar anti-entitlement lobby’s standard news release, loaded with crisis rhetoric and a core misunderstanding about how the Social Security Trust Fund is designed.  All to build the case for cutting already modest benefits in Social Security.

The good news is that, unlike many newspapers, USA Today does have a standard policy of offering rebuttals, as they did to our President/CEO, Max Richtman.  You can read USA Today’s call for benefit cuts in their OpEd here

And this is NCPSSM’s rebuttal.  Please take a moment to comment on these articles and share Max’s rebuttal to help journalists understand why strengthening Social Security benefits is so important to working Americans when they retire.


There’s No Reason for Benefit Cuts: Opposing View

Social Security’s impending doom has been foretold since before the first benefit check was ever delivered. The crisis calls are familiar:

“Social Security is bankrupt!”

“The trust fund isn’t real!”

“We have to cut benefits!”

The truth is very different. Social Security remains strong and will be able to pay full benefits until 2034. After that, there will still be enough income coming into the program to pay 79% of all benefits. But with an average monthly benefit of just $1,300, most beneficiaries cannot afford a 21% benefit cut, and that’s why Congress must pass modest reforms, as it has many times before.

Doing nothing is not an option. However, in this hyper-partisan environment where cutting benefits is worn as a bad

ge of courage with little thought to what those cuts actually mean to working Americans, it’s virtually impossible to engage in a meaningful debate.

Raising the retirement age, cutting the cost-of-living adjustment, privatization and means testing are all benefit cut proposals touted by the billion dollar anti-entitlement lobby and its supporters in Congress as the best ways to close Social Security’s shortfall. The American people support an entirely different approach. Poll after poll, including an important public survey by the National Academy of Social Insurance, show that large bipartisan majorities want to improve benefits and are willing to pay more to stabilize and strengthen the program.

There is no reason for Social Security benefit cuts that would force vulnerable Americans to bear an even greater financial burden than they already do. The fiscal woes of this nation are not due to this worker-funded program, which currently has $2.8 trillion in its trust fund.

Numerous proposals languishing in Congress would extend Social Security’s solvency while also improving benefits by lifting the payroll tax cap, adopting a cost-of-living adjustment for the elderly, expanding the minimum benefit and boosting benefits overall. These are reasonable reforms that deserve consideration.

Max Richtman is president and CEO of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security & Medicare.

USA Today Permalink here

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